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Adult Winter Reading Program: 1940s Titles

Hollow City
Hollow City by Ransom Riggs (1940s)
This second installment of the Miss Peregrine's Peculiar Children series pickups up immediately where the first left off. The action is fast paced and storyline intriguing as the children face the horrors of the war accompanied with the hunters after them while trying to help their beloved teacher and mentor. -- Added by ldmccormick on 02/06/2014

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The Book Thief
The Book Thief by Markus Zusak (1940s)
This is a Holocaust-era story, set in 1940's Germany, intended as a young readers' novel, and recently made into a movie. I found this book particularly interesting because it is narrated by Death, which offers an interesting point of view. I especially liked that Death is able to foreshadow, saying things like, "Don't worry. I'm not here for (character) yet." There was no need to skip ahead to find out if things would end well or badly... the reader already knows. -- Added by Zivah on 02/06/2014

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Between Shades of Gray
Between Shades of Gray by Ruta Sepetys (1940s)
Categorized as a youth book for grades 6 to 8, a very informative historical fiction work. The book tells the story of a Lithuanian family that is deported by the Soviet secret police and ultimately sent to Siberia where they are kept for 15 years. Told from the perspective of the young girl, an artist, that records her surroundings and people through drawings. It is a heart wrenching story of survival during a time of history often forgotten. I enjoyed the book. -- Added by kcheesman on 02/04/2014

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The Catcher in the Rye
The Catcher in the Rye by Jerome David Salinger (1940s)
A Fun easy book to read that is about thoughts and ideas we all probably had in high school or/and college -- Added by rjudd6@sbcglobal.net on 02/04/2014

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The Storyteller
The Storyteller by Jodi Picoult (1940s)
Heart-wrenching tale of a granddaughter's search to find the truth about an old man's revelation that he was an SS offer at Auschwitz. This tale told from several character's perspective is riveting. -- Added by booklover14 on 02/03/2014

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1984
1984 by George Orwell (1940s)
Not what I expected but an interesting read nonetheless. Truly a classic that spans time. -- Added by hden06 on 02/01/2014

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Anne Frank
Anne Frank by Melissa Müller (1940s)
Really the story of who Anne was--not so much about her circumstances but of her as a person. -- Added by GuineaPigMama on 01/30/2014

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Red Blood, Black Sand
Red Blood, Black Sand by Chuck Tatum (1940s)
I wanted to read an actual account of the battle of Iwo Jima because my uncle was also a part of it. It was really interesting to me. I strongly recommend it to all who want a true understanding of this event that is a big part of America's heritage. -- Added by Joan on 01/29/2014

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Princess Elizabeth's Spy
Princess Elizabeth's Spy by Susan Elia MacNeal (1940s)
I found this book very interesting and captivating. I kept hoping I could check out the book format so I didn't have to wait for the reader to get to the end. Please don't misunderstand. I actually liked the reader but I wanted to know the end quicker. I assume this book is a work of fiction but I liked that she used real life events and wove the story around them. Who knows? It could have happened. Anything is possible and with all of the secrets of WWII, it might have. I will definately read the next one in the series. I'm hooked. -- Added by Roundaboutgirl on 01/29/2014

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The Book Thief
The Book Thief by Markus Zusak (1940s)
This book was amazing! The creative way in which it was narrated was like nothing I have ever read. The character development was done so well that I felt like I was saying goodbye to people I knew. -- Added by jacks1997 on 01/29/2014

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The Longest Ride
The Longest Ride by Nicholas Sparks (1940s)
Two simple, sweet love stories that eventually intertwine. Not very realistic, but easy to read. -- Added by natashaelise on 01/29/2014

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Hell's Guest
Hell's Guest by Glenn Frazier (1940s)
Colonel Glenn Frazier, featured in Ken Burns' PBS documentary "The War" is a living testament to the horrors of WWII -- and to the power of forgiveness. -- Added by OneMoreChapter on 01/28/2014

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The Book Thief
The Book Thief by Markus Zusak (1940s)
Great Book and the writing style is very unique. The narrator is Death which can be confusing at first if you don't know in advance. I highly recommend this book. -- Added by Jean P on 01/28/2014

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The Final Storm
The Final Storm by Jeff Shaara (1940s)
Jeff Shaara has written about the ending of the Second World War with lots of great characters. It was easy to read. I was amazed with the stories about the transferring of the atom bomb. judy -- Added by jroche1@indy.rr.com on 01/27/2014

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Shadow of the Bomb
Shadow of the Bomb by Robert Goldsborough (1940s)
By the author of Nero Wolfe stories (follow-ons to Rex Stout's), it is set at the time and in the place of the development of the atomic bombs. -- Added by 6thgenhoosier on 01/27/2014

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