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Adult Winter Reading Program: 1980s Titles

Death in Springtime
Death in Springtime by Magdalen Nabb (1980s)
This story takes place in Florence, Italy. It opens with a freak snowstorm on March 1, which turns out to be a key factor in the story, since no one who experienced it can remember observing other circumstances which could help Marshal Guarnaccia solve the mystery of a kidnapped foreign university student. This is the 3rd in a series of 14. It was an interesting plot, and I learned about some interesting cultural differences between Italians of different regions. A quick read. -- Added by ElizabethR on 01/19/2014

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A Clockwork Orange
A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess (1980s)
When "A Clockwork Orange" was originally published in 1962, the US publisher omitted the final chapter, in which the narrator Alex begins to question his life of violence. In 1986 it was reissued with the missing chapter included, in which Alex is perhaps on the verge of freely choosing to act in a civilized manner instead of being programed into it. This novel is not Burgess's favorite of his own works because it is too didactic. In reading Burgess's introduction one might conclude that the ultimate enemy of moral freedom in the modern world is neither God nor Devil but "the Almighty State [which] is increasingly replacing both." It does capture the dynamic of being part of a youth subculture whose self-identity is shaped by alienation from "respectable" society,and its language, once penetrated, is poetic. -- Added by Indy7steve on 01/18/2014

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Persepolis Two
Persepolis Two by Marjane Satrapi (1980s)
A continuation of Persepolis. -- Added by jsteele56 on 01/16/2014

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In the Wet
In the Wet by Nevil Shute (1980s)
Written in the 1950s, the book forecasts a Great Britain in the 1980s that is failing because of radical socialism and consequent action taken by Queen Elisabeth. The author manages these time differences most creatively. The main characters live in Australia, and the title is a phrase used by Australians to describe the rainy season. The author, an aeronautical engineer, was expert at telling intriguing stories in natural language and with no superfluous characters or subplots. All of his books were reprinted four years ago, demonstrating his continued popularity. -- Added by 6thgenhoosier on 01/15/2014

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A is for Alibi
A is for Alibi by Sue Grafton (1980s)
A friend gave me a bag full of the "alphabet mysteries" as they're now known. I understand the author is already on "W" -- heaven help me! -- Added by OneMoreChapter on 01/15/2014

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The Burden of Proof
The Burden of Proof by Scott Turow (1980s)
I discovered Turow only recently and am enthralled by the depth, intrigue, and surprise endings of his legal dramas. I highly recommend this, his second book, and his first offering, Presumed Innocent. -- Added by Sbspong on 01/15/2014

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Children of the Jacaranda Tree
Children of the Jacaranda Tree by Sahar Delijani (1980s)
A great book! -- Added by CFA on 01/14/2014

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Pomegranate Soup
Pomegranate Soup by Marsha Mehran (1980s)
A wonderful story of three sisters who leave Iran for the "wilds" of Ireland. -- Added by CFA on 01/14/2014

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Sycamore Row
Sycamore Row by John Grisham (1980s)
Great read, good sequel. -- Added by ozreader on 01/13/2014

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In the Wet
In the Wet by Nevil Shute (1980s)
"In The Wet", by British author Nevil Shute, was written in 1953, but a large percentage of the book takes place in 1983, in future Britain, Canada, and Australia. An Anglican priest ministers to a dying man, and learns the story of an Australian Air Force pilot in the future! 1983 England has been ruined and bled dry by Socialism. The Royal Family is inconvenienced and abused; the Queen enlists the Australian Air Force pilot to help her and her family seek refuge in Australia. An interesting characteristic of democracies in the "future" is the "multiple vote"; everyone gets one vote, but additional votes can be earned by individuals for advanced education, integrity, and fidelity in marriage. -- Added by pittsburghpolish on 01/12/2014

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V is for Vengeance
V is for Vengeance by Sue Grafton (1980s)
Sue Grafton's intrepid detective Kinsey Milhone is back in this story which explores several disparate plot lines in another intriguing story. An arrogant young gambler suffers an unexpectedly unpleasant fate. Kinsey flags a shoplifter at Nordstrom's and is later hired to find the woman (who disappeared after being arrested & bailed out) by her elderly fiance. We learn about a gangster who wants out of the family "business" and his family who have other ideas. It's all woven together by Grafton's skillful prose, set in 1988 Santa Teresa, CA. I really enjoy her books and look forward to W Is for Wasted, but am sad too, knowing that there will only be 3 more Kinsey books after that. -- Added by ElizabethR on 01/11/2014

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The Transit of Venus
The Transit of Venus by Shirley Hazzard (1980s)
This book was recommended to me and is highly acclaimed: it is a compelling book however the author's style of writing differs from traditional writing and was difficult to follow at times; I found myself re-reading sentences and paragraphs often. I would recommend it to those who enjoy classics. -- Added by cindyj on 01/11/2014

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Sycamore Row
Sycamore Row by John Grisham (1980s)
A suicide and a handwritten will begin a fight over millions of dollars in this new novel which takes readers back to Clanton, Mississippi and re-introduces Lawyer Jake Brigance. Readers may remember Brigance from Grisham's first book, A Time to Kill. -- Added by Peter on 01/11/2014

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